11 October 2012

salzburg :: true love locks (or something like that)


You've likely seen or at least read about the locks of love that fill the railings and fences of bridges across Europe. (Have you seen it in the States, too?) As mundane as they have become, the ubiquitous locks continue to draw me in for closer inspection. This time the two eight-year-old girls were drawn to them, too. I love how children have a way of making everything new and fresh again.


Richard explained the locks, includingthe fact that after a couple professes their "true love forever" they throw the key into the river, likely sealing it with a big sloppy kiss. Ewwwww! After inspecting several of the locks that span the length of the foot bridge across the Salzach River, the girls were very concerned about the permanence of the locks. "Do they look for the key at the bottom of the river if the couple breaks up? How do they find the key?"

 

"Look! I found one with no key needed. Perfect. " So much for true love forever.

 


And then she found these...




Each evenly-spaced lock of love is inscribed (with Sharpie) with the name of "Rusche," each followed by a different female name: Anna, Maria, Helga, and so on. I have a feeling that our boy Rusche is using his locks a bit differently than a symbol of his "true love forever." More like his "true love last night." Or maybe he just keeps getting dumped and can't find the key at the bottom of the river? 


8 comments:

  1. I hear some places cut them off! I think they are pretty cool. I have never heard of Rusche as a last name. It means frill. However, I suppose you are right with it being a last night for someone. Could also be a group of girls in vacation who thought it would be fun to put up locks.

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    1. I'm sure whatever the meaning that part of the intent was to make people like me wonder! Hmmm... frill, you say? I like your idea of the girls on vacation!
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  2. Fun! I haven't seen this in the states (yet), I love all of the colors! What a great way to get rid of all of the luggage locks that you can no longer use, and profess your love at the same time.

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    1. I don't remember seeing it in the States either, but we do see it in European cities quite a bit. Maybe you could start a trend? How cool would that be?
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  3. Haha, love that last one. Convenient that he used the same type of lock each time ;)

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  4. I always loved seeing locks whenever we traveled in Europe. I always wanted to leave one but never did...maybe we'll start it here. My favorite shot is that final one....beautiful shot, Dana.

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  5. nina roberts11/28/12, 10:23 PM

    Me and my husband are here in Salzburg for just the one night, but can not find a place to buy a lock from, someone is missing out on a business opportunity!!

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    1. Accckkk! This is very interesting. Also, thanks for the tip! I think a lock will be a perfect stocking stuffer for my girl who will visit Paris after Christmas. It can be a lock of family love, right? :)
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